March 28, 2007

The woeful state of health care

Posted in Customer Lack of Service at 12:42 pm by loolar

So my new job as a teacher for the LA Unified School District gives me wonderful benefits – supposedly.  We’re with Blue Cross now, and when I was buying my own health care, I was also with Blue Cross, and they’re pretty decent.  Of course, then I was with a PPO, and now I’m with an HMO.  And therein lies the dilemma.

My doctor of six years, Joe Pachorek of Pasadena, will no longer see me because of the switch.  They’re “full up” of HMO customers, you see.  So, have a nice day, you’re someone else’s problem now.  His office manager basically shrugged and didn’t even offer me a good luck.  Six year relationship?  Whatever – you’re just unwanted paperwork.

This is the state of our semi-socialized medicine system.  Broken.  When human relationships mean nothing, and the quality of your care is based on which club you join.  Many people stay with deplorable jobs for the sole reason of staying with existing health care, due to a pre-existing condition or a doctor who actually understands their needs.  What kind of solution is this?

I predict a not-too-distant future where doctors will actually be eliminated from the equation.  In true HMO bureaucratic style, you will call an automated line, and you’ll be overnighted a pill.  “For allergies, press one now.  For chronic pain, press two now.  If you are in danger of bleeding out and dying, please stand by; an operator will be with you shortly.  We are experiencing high call volumes.  Your estimated wait time is three hours.  Please call back another time.  Thank you for choosing Don’tCare.”

Seriously, why have a doctor at all?  People don’t matter anymore in the medical profession.  Just overnight my pill and move on to customer #438612.

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1 Comment »

  1. Wordman said,

    “I predict a not-too-distant future where doctors will actually be eliminated from the equation.” No need. It’s already here. Doctors are victims of the same “stay with deplorable jobs for the sole reason of staying with existing health care” because it costs them to much to switch malpractice insurers (which, of course, is required if you move states). Insurance premiums have essentially turned doctors into indentured servants of insurance companies.


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